The Pollinator Monitoring Scheme

Can you help monitor pollinating insects?

BWARS is supporting the new national Pollinator Monitoring Scheme (PoMS). The scheme is being launched this year as part of the Pollinator Monitoring and Research Partnership, which aims to combine improved analyses of long-term records with new systematic survey activity to establish how insect pollinator populations are changing across Great Britain.

One element of PoMS is a simple and fun "Flower-Insect Timed Count" (FIT Count). To take part, recorders are asked to spend ten minutes counting all the insects that land on a particular flower species, within a 50cm square. For the FIT Count you only need to identify insects to a broad species group (e.g. honeybees; bumblebees; hoverflies etc.). Full details and supporting materials are available from the CEH website:

www.ceh.ac.uk/our-science/projects/pollinator-monitoring

Please do take part in the FIT Count if you can, and help BWARS support this new monitoring scheme.

Background:

The Pollinator Monitoring Scheme (PoMS) is part of the UK Pollinator Monitoring and Research Partnership, co-ordinated by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). It is jointly funded by Defra, the Welsh and Scottish Governments, JNCC and project partners, including CEH, the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Butterfly Conservation, British Trust for Ornithology, Hymettus, the University of Reading and University of Leeds. PoMS aims to provide much-needed data on the state of the UK’s insect pollinators, especially wild bees and hoverflies, and the role they fulfil in supporting farming and wildlife. PoMS will include several different approaches to pollinator monitoring, including the FIT Count as well as a new systematic survey of pollinators and floral resources on a network of stratified random sites across England, Scotland and Wales, initially funded for two years but aiming to continue beyond this to generate data on long-term trends.

 

Specific enquiries about PoMS can be sent to:

poms@ceh.ac.uk


Bombus lapidarius Photo: CEH/Martin Harvey

Andrena haemorrhoa Photo: CEH/Nadine Mitschunas